5 Ways to Bring in New Business

October 1st, 2014

5 Ways to Bring in New Business

5 Ways to Bring in New Business

Marketing any type of business always has one essential goal: to bring in new clients. It can be daunting since it’s a never-ending process. Our efforts sometimes don’t pay off immediately, but instead give us a more long-term yield. That can be disheartening when you need clients now. I’ve found the best way to make sure you have a consistent flow of inquiries is to make sure you’re combining both short- and long-term marketing plans. Here are six ideas to help you formulate your new client campaign.

Long-Term

Creating and sticking to long-term marketing efforts can be time-consuming and a bit tedious at first. However, they’re crucial to establishing a credible brand presence with your audience, and they will yield results over time. (For more on other long-term ventures that yield amazing results, check out my last two articles on the “compound effect.”)Want to read this photography training article? Log in and launch this free photography training magazine // October 2014 issue or create a free account by clicking here.

Want to read this photography training article? Log in and launch this free photography training magazine // October 2014 issue or create a free account by clicking here.

Stop the Madness

October 1st, 2014

Stop the Madness

 

Stop the Madness

We live in a digital world, there is no argument there. How we, as photographers, adapt to this changing world is a subject of heated debate.

This month, we produced an episode of Shutter Network on this very subject, but there still seems to be massive confusion on how and where to incorporate this into your business.

Let’s have a reality check on the digital state of the industry. Yes, we are living in a digital world and yes, our clients want the digital files. So what? If they want your car keys, will you hand those over too? You are running a business. You are trying to pay your bills. You are trying to reinvest into your business. Where is this money coming from? You have to think and act like a business and not like a starving artist.

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Wedding Photo + Video: Why You Should Be Offering Both

October 1st, 2014

Wedding Photo + Video: Why You Should Be Offering Both

Wedding Photo + Video: Why You Should Be Offering Both

Of the hundreds of photographers and filmmakers I know, only four offer both. Why? Isn’t it easer than ever these days to find affordable equipment and become a professional wedding photographer or filmmaker? Yes. Is the education easy to find? Yes. Are you already using a camera that allows you to take professional video and photos? Yes. So why isn’t every photographer offering both? Let’s look at the top excuses.

Excuse #1:
“I don’t know how to be a photographer” or “I don’t know how to become a filmmaker.”

Surely all you filmmakers feel it must be nearly impossible to take photos like a pro. Most of you reading this article are photographers, and many of you are scared to hit the Record button. How many of you video people have been to weddings where you feel like you know more about lighting and composition than the photographer? Hell, half the weddings we attend, we know more about music and sound than the deejay. Just to be fair, there’s a ton of new filmmakers out there who know nothing about communication, lighting or posing. You might think you don’t know how to do one or the other, but everyone starts somewhere. Brides and grooms are not comparing you to the greatest photographer or filmmaker in the world. If you just try it by throwing yourself in the fire, you will be just fine. Not knowing how to do everything is what makes photo/video jobs so fun.

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Children’s Portraits That Sell

October 1st, 2014

Children’s Portraits That Sell

Children’s Portraits That Sell

These days, most moms have a nice camera, and many moms take photos of their kids daily. So why would someone choose a pro in 2014? And if they do choose a pro, what are the images that will sell?

Recently I had a group of photographers ask me for a “shot list.” When I asked what exactly they were looking for, one of them replied, “You know, a list of poses that sell!”

The truth is that once upon a time, I probably thought the same way as I went into a session. What list of poses could I create over and over that would be the best-sellers? But as time went by, I began to realize there really was no “money shot.” Sure, there might be some things that I do each and every time because of a reaction that I might get. There are games I play with different ages of kids to get certain looks or to keep their attention. But I learned that without a reason to buy, the photo isn’t going to sell, and the reasons moms buy are all about the experience we create for their kids. It’s about the way we interpret a child’s personality and interests—visually with the camera and verbally as we communicate with Mom about what we see with our camera.

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Creative Editing: Adding Grit to your Urban Portraits

October 1st, 2014

Creative Editing: Adding Grit to your Urban Portraits

Creative Editing: Adding Grit to your Urban Portraits

When shooting portraits in urban spaces, composing the subject and architecture can seem daunting because the architecture can overpower your posed subject, especially when shooting wider shots. This common issue can be solved with proper post-production editing to give back the emphasis to your subject. Editing the image is as important as capturing it. Paying close attention to the details in the image and removing the distractions is the first step. Adding grit to your photos allows those unique vertical shots to stay in your portfolio and become a marketable piece for your client.

After all, these are portraits and not just documents of urban spaces. That’s where sizing, cropping and sharpening the image will give it that polished look. Let’s open your RAW image in Photoshop and get started.

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Marketing Your Portraiture

October 1st, 2014

Marketing Your Portraiture

Marketing Your Portraiture

Just a few weeks ago, I got a call from a photographer friend who was thoroughly frustrated with business challenges. He was on overload, and called me for a pep talk. Thirty minutes later, he was out of the slump, and had some solid reminders of his potential.

“Find out what everybody else is doing and then offer something different.”

That’s a quote from a good buddy, long-time photographer Terry Clark. It was the perfect starting point for pep talk.

Great portraiture can make your work stand out, and it starts with your skill set. You need to understand lighting and posing. Just learning a couple of basics and then practicing relentlessly is a great way to start.

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The Art of Boudoir Portraits

October 1st, 2014

The Art of Boudoir Portraits

The Art of Boudoir Portraits

In most portraits, clients want to capture an image of themselves at a particular moment in time, usually smiling and projecting what they wish to share with others, such as professionalism, happiness or serenity. Clients who want to share a more intimate side of themselves book a boudoir portrait.

Boudoir clients are encouraged to express private, powerful emotions in intimate settings. Clothing is minimal. We use lighting that accentuates the curves, outfits that cling and graze, and atmosphere that sets a sexy mood.

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The Changing Times: Family Portraits and The Economy

October 1st, 2014

The Changing Times: Family Portraits and The Economy

The Changing Times: Family Portraits and The Economy

Family portraits are among the most prized possessions in most people’s homes. I’ve heard countless people say that their family pictures would be one of the first things they would grab if their house were on fire. With the ubiquity of camera phones, family portraits seem less important. It is my mission to continue to remind everyone why it is so important to continue to update their family portraits.

For today’s client, the experience is just as important as the images. One of the biggest things I do to continue to grow the family category of my business is to give myself extra time to chat. I generally allow two hours for each family session. This allows me time to really get to know my client by making small talk. Most business exchanges these days are all about collecting money and moving to the next transaction. You want to make sure you are making it known that your clients mean the world to you. Customer service has never been more important. We need to create an environment that makes their spending feel justified.

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Featured Artist: Craig LaMere – Professional Portrait Photographer

October 1st, 2014

Featured Artist: Craig LaMere   Professional Portrait Photographer

Featured Artist: Craig LaMere – Professional Portrait Photographer

Tell us a little about yourself and your studio.
I’m from the great state of Idaho, and have pretty much lived here my whole life. I have my little girl boxer, Logan, my bulldog, Lincoln, and my two cats, Emit and Martin. In January, I will have been shooting for five years. I was a high school receiver coach for 12 years, and just quit last year due to my crazy schedule. I opened my first studio a year after I started shooting, and moved into my second one this past February. I really have loved every second of it. Being from a small market, I shoot almost every genre at my studio, with the only exception being babies, which I most definitely do not shoot, because they poop and pee everywhere, and I have a firm rule at my studio that I’m the only one who is allowed to poop and pee all over!

How did you get into photography?
When I was younger, to say I had very little direction would be like saying the ocean has some water in it. I really had no idea what I wanted to do with my life, but I always knew I would find that “something.” I’ve had a huge entrepreneurial sprit my whole life. I’ve always tried to start this or that, but never found anything that really grabbed me 100 percent.

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